2010 U.S. Census Summary

Highlights of new 2010 Census Data, released March 22, 2011:

Even though Michigan's population overall decreased slightly from 2000 to 2010, several areas of the state experienced significant growth, including Northwest Michigan.

Over the last decade, the population of the 10 counties within "Region 10," (the Northwest Michigan Council of Governments, including Emmet County) grew by 5.8 percent, according to the figures released by the Census Bureau on March 22, 2011.

The data shows Emmet County's population is 32,694, indicating a 0-5 percent gain from the 2000 Census.

The population of the West Michigan area, Planning Region 8 which consists of seven counties in the Grand Rapids area, also grew significantly, by 6 percent over the last decade.

Those areas losing population include the city of Detroit, cities with more than 100,000 residents, central metropolitan counties and northeastern Michigan.

The state's total population is 9,883,640.

To read a summary of the Michigan census results, click here.


Areas of Growth and Decline

Several areas of the state experienced significant growth.


• Areas of population growth include:
+6.2% townships as a group
+6.0% West Michigan 
(Planning Region 8, which consists of seven counties in the Grand Rapids area)
+5.8%Northwest Michigan 
(Planning Region 10, which consists of 10 counties in the Traverse City area 
including Emmet County)
+4.0% fringe metropolitan counties

• Areas of population decline include
-25.0% the city of Detroit
-15.5% cities with 100,000 or more residents
-6.8% cities as a group
-4.2% central metropolitan counties
-3.2% Northeast Michigan 
(Planning Region 9, which consists of eight counties north of Higgins Lake and 
generally east of I-75)
-2.0% the Upper Peninsula


The population count for the city of Detroit (713,777) is considerably lower than expected from both SEMCOG’s latest estimate (772,419 for July 2010) and the Census Bureau’s latest estimate (910,920 for 2009). The Census Bureau’s estimate was based in part on an alternative methodology that is used for communities that challenge their initial estimate. Because the alternative methodology assumes no change in vacancy rate or household size since the prior census, it tends to overstate population levels for most of the communities that challenge their initial figures. Future use of the alternative methodology is under review by the Census Bureau. 

The data for Michigan shows that the five most populous incorporated places and their 2010 Census counts are Detroit, 713,777; Grand Rapids, 188,040; Warren, 134,056; Sterling Heights, 129,699; and Lansing, 114,297. Detroit decreased by 25 percent since the 2000 Census. Grand Rapids decreased by 4.9 percent, Warren decreased by 3 percent, Sterling Heights grew by 4.2 percent, and Lansing decreased by 4.1 percent.

The largest county is Wayne, with a population of 1,820,584. Its population decreased by 11.7 percent since 2000. The other counties in the top five include Oakland, with a population of 1,202,362 (increase of 0.7 percent); Macomb, 840,978 (increase of 6.7 percent); Kent, 602,622 (increase of 4.9 percent); and Genesee, 425,790 (decrease of 2.4 percent).

Census data is used by state officials to realign congressional and state legislative districts, taking into account population shifts since the 2000 Census.

Race and Hispanic Origin
Like other states, Michigan has continued to become more racially diverse. Although its non-Hispanic white population decreased, most of Michigan’s other principal race and Hispanic population categories increased from 2000 to 2010.

Michigan’s non-Hispanic Asian population has increased slightly faster than any of Michigan’s other major race/Hispanic groups since 2000. This segment of Michigan’s population increased by 34.9 percent from 2000-2010. When combined with Pacific Islanders, the increase was 34.5 percent, which is very close to the growth of 34.7 percent that had been expected from the Census Bureau’s latest population estimates.
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Michigan’s Hispanic population grew by 34.7 percent from 2000 to 2010. This is somewhat higher than the growth of 31.7 percent that had been expected from the Census Bureau’s latest population estimates. This is consistent with the experience of other states. (Of the first 32 states for which census data was released, 28 had higher Hispanic populations than previously expected. The total Hispanic population of these 32 states exceeded the expected level by 1.6 percent.)

Michigan’s non-Hispanic white population declined by 3.0 percent, which is somewhat greater than the decline of 2.1 percent that had been expected from the Census Bureau’s latest population estimates. This is consistent with the experience of other states. (Of the first 32 states for which census data was released, 28 had lower non-Hispanic white populations than previously expected. The total non-Hispanic white population of these 32 states was 1.6 percent lower than the expected level.)


Distribution of Michigan Population by Race and Hispanic Origin

Race Category % of Total % Change Since 2000 

Total Population 100.0% - 0.6%
Hispanic 4.4% +34.7%
Non-Hispanic White Alone 76.6% - 3.0%
Non-Hispanic Black Alone 14.0% - 1.3%
Non-Hispanic Native American Alone 0.6% +2.3%
Non-Hispanic Asian/Pacific Alone 2.4% 34.5%
Non-Hispanic Multiracial 1.9% 16.5% 


Housing Units and Vacancy Rates

Michigan’s housing stock increased by 7.0 percent from 4,234,279 in 2000 to 4,532,233 in 2010. Its vacancy rate increased from 10.6% to 14.6%. Most of the housing units that are classified as vacant in the Census are second homes and seasonal residences, and they are concentrated in the northern half of the state. 

To read more about the Census results for Michigan and the United States, click here.